Department of Health and Human Services' logo Department of Health and Human Services

Public Health Service
Food and Drug Administration

 

5100 Paint Branch Pkwy
College Park, MD 20740-3835

May 28, 2003
WARNING LETTER
VIA CERTIFIED MAIL, RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED

Forever Young (PTY), Ltd
76 Parsley Avenue, Annlin
Pretoria, South Africa ZA

Ref. No. CL-03-HFS-810-47

Dear Sir or Madam:

This is to advise you that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reviewed your web site at the Internet address: http://www.annique.com and has determined that the products "Garlic, Rooibos, and Fish Oil Capsules," "Royal Jelly, Selenium and Vitamin E Capsules," and "B-Healthy Capsules" being offered are promoted for conditions that cause these products to be drugs under section 201(g)(1) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act) [21 USC 321(g)(1)]. These products may be considered a drug because of the therapeutic claims as shown on your web site establish their intended use as a drug.

Examples of some of the claims observed on your web site include:

Garlic, Rooibos, and Fish Oil Capsules

"It will keep blood pressure down … build the immune system against viral and bacterial infections."

"…helps protect the body from viral infections and allergic reactions."

"…a good protective agent against flu and colds."

"…help protect [the body] against viral invasion."

"…are both potent anti-allergic agents and ideal for persons suffering from hay-fever or congestion."

"The Annique Rooibos & Garlic capsules is [sic] a disease fighting combination that's unbeatable!"

Royal Jelly, Selenium and Vitamin E Capsules

"…provides [sic] an unbeatable fighting machine against … depression."

B-Healthy Capsules

"B-Healthy… protect[s] you from "…viral infections and allergies."."

"Smokers, especially, are in dire need of the B-Healthy to protect the body against cancer… and other infections…."

Furthermore, FDA has no information that your products are generally recognized as safe and effective for the above referenced conditions and therefore, these products may also be "new drugs" under section 201 (p) of the Act [21 USC 321(p)]. New drugs may not be legally marketed in the U.S. without prior approval from FDA as described in section 505(a) of the Act [21 USC 355(a)]. FDA approves a new drug on the basis of scientific data submitted by a drug sponsor to demonstrate that the drug is safe and effective.

FDA is aware that Internet distributors may not know that the products they offer are regulated as drugs or that these drugs are not in compliance with the law. Many of these products may be legally marketed as dietary supplements or as cosmetics if therapeutic claims are removed from the promotional materials and the products otherwise comply with all applicable provisions of the Act and FDA regulations.

Under the Act, as amended by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), dietary supplements may be legally marketed with truthful and non-misleading claims to affect the structure or function of the body (structure/function claims), if certain conditions are met. However, claims that dietary supplements are intended to prevent, diagnose, mitigate, treat, or cure disease (disease claims), excepting health claims authorized for use by FDA, cause the products to be drugs. The intended use of a product may be established through product labels and labeling, catalogs, brochures, audio and videotapes, Internet sites, or other circumstances surrounding the distribution of the product. FDA has published a final rule intended to clarify the distinction between structure/function claims and disease claims. This document is available on the Internet at http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/fr000106.html (codified at 21 CFR 101.93(g)).

In addition, only products that are intended for ingestion may be lawfully marketed as dietary supplements. Topical products and products intended to enter into the body directly through the skin or mucosal tissues, such as transdermal or sublingual products, are not dietary supplements. For these products, both disease and structure/function claims may cause them to be new drugs.

Certain over-the-counter drugs are not new drugs and may be legally marketed without prior approval from FDA. Additional information is available in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR) Parts 310 and 330-358, which contain FDA's regulations on over-the-counter drugs.

The agency is taking steps to warn citizens that drugs promoted and sold via the Internet, from foreign sources, may not be approved for marketing in this country, and may not be legally imported. With copies of this letter, we are advising regulatory drug officials in the countries from which you operate of these potential violations. In addition, we are advising the US Customs Service through an Import Alert that all shipments offered for importation into the United States as a result of your activities may be detained and subject to refusal of entry.

This letter is not intended to be an all-inclusive review of your web site and products your firm may market. It is your responsibility to ensure that all products marketed by your firm are in compliance with theAct and its implementing regulations.

If you need additional information or have questions concerning any products distributed through your web site, please contact FDA. You may reach FDA electronically (e-mail) at APope@CFSAN.FDA.GOV, or you may respond in writing to Angela F. Pope, Compliance Officer, Food and Drug Administration, Division of Compliance and Enforcement, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy, College Park, MD 20740-3835. If you have any questions concerning any issue in this letter, please contact Ms Pope at 301-436-2375.

Sincerely
yours,
/s/
Susan J. Walker, MD
Acting Director,
Division of Dietary Supplement Programs
Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling and Dietary Supplements
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

This page was posted on July 31, 2005.

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